Centre of Expertise Global Governance

New actors and new solutions for global governance challenges
About

The Centre of Expertise for Global Governance aims to find out what is exactly happening within and between governing bodies and the actors that take part in them. We look at the interplay of new and traditional actors within the ‘grey zones’ of operation between international, national, regional, local and non-territorial players.

The age of globalization has left us with a world marked by increasing political complexity and cross-border issues. Governance structures on all levels are transforming. New actors have joined the stage and change traditional routines, creating new opportunities and challenges for participation and cooperation. New solutions are being developed to tackle new, contemporary demands.

Our centre combines three research groups at The Hague University of Applied Sciences: The Changing role of Europe (CRoEU), UN studies in Peace and Justice (UNPJ) and Multilevel Regulation (MLR). Each from its own perspective, we seek to enhance the understanding of the way in which contemporary governance structures are organized, changing and, importantly, how these changes affect the general public as well as (future) professionals. Our shared perspective enables us to obtain better ‘grip’ on what is happening within and between governance structures, identifying the road ahead for regained trust in public authority.


Our mission

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Projects

Projects

Global Challenges in 365 Days: Creating student science on global governance

Global Challenges in 365 Days: Creating student science on global governance

How do students understand global governance? And how much does it matter to them and their generation? These questions are central to the project ‘Global Challenges in 365 days.
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Professional training courses on ‘Global Governance in Practice’

Professional training courses on ‘Global Governance in Practice’

The mission of the Centre of Expertise on Global Governance ‘New actors, new solutions’ is to increase the understanding of students, professionals and citizens about how global governance works in practice.
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The Community of Practice on Global Governance in practice

The Community of Practice on Global Governance in practice

Our Community of Practice (CoP) is a group of researchers, students and practitioners who share the mission of the Centre of Expertise in helping new or underrepresented actors find their role in Global Governance.
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The Textbook on “Global Governance in Practice”

The Textbook on “Global Governance in Practice”

One of the important missions of our Centre is to increase practical knowledge of students on issues of global governance in selected programmes at THUAS. For this purpose, the Centre has started the development of a student textbook on Global Governance in Practice.

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News

Researchers in the spotlight

Researcher in the spotlight: Christine Tremblay

Christine Tremblay, lecturer at The Hague University of Applied Sciences, is starting a weekly reading discussion group exploring diversity and inclusion. Diversity and inclusion is an important and vibrant subject for THUAS studen...

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Researcher in the spotlight: Ruud Schapenk

“It’s a major challenge for any researcher to convey the results of dense research in an accessible and almost effervescent way. However, a podcast is an excellent way to achieve that. Together with Dr. Mendeltje van Keulen, profes...

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Publications

Recent publications 

 

Decentralisatie: hét antwoord op de Arabische Lente?

The so-called “Arab Spring” originated in the socio-economic grievances which resulted from the long-standing regional inequalities in many countries in the Middle East and North Africa. One of the policy responses was to deepen ongoing decentralisation reforms, or design and implement new ones, ostensibly in a bid to increase citizen participation in local governance and service delivery. In this article published by the Clingendael Spectator, Sylvia I. Bergh takes stock of these reforms in Morocco, Tunisia, and Jordan, and finds that the reforms’ implementation suffer from weak or ambiguous legal frameworks and a lack of adequate human and financial resources. Decentralisation reforms have at best offered a (temporary) solution to the crisis of legitimacy of both authoritarian regimes and newly elected governments. However, they do not (yet) provide a substantive response the protesters' ongoing demands for socio-economic justice.
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Centre of Expertise Publications

Team