International Communication Management - English - 3 years - Full-time

How do brands like Patagonia and Toms capture the imagination of consumers? Why has Unilever impressed investors with its belief that ‘sustainable business’ is good for business? On ICM you’ll learn how a sustainable communicator can have a positive influence on creating a better world. You’ll learn how to become a marketing communications specialist who can strengthen relationships with consumers, a PR professional who can win back the trust of stakeholders with action rather than words, or a leader who inspires employees to act with integrity. You’ll learn about various communication disciplines, applied research and creative and critical thinking. The group projects that you complete in the first two years will test your ability to advise real companies on their communication strategy. An optional exchange, a five month internationally orientated internship, and a thesis finalise your development as a communications expert ready for the global workplace.

Contact the study

Follow or 'like' us on Facebook.

Contact the student

Maike Zimmerman – International Communication Management Hi, I'm Maike, a second year International Communication Management Student. I live in The Hague close to the university. I love sports, travelling, going to festivals and baking. Do you have any questions about study life at the Hague University of Applied Sciences, finding a room, life in The Hague and Holland, where to go and what to do, ICM, or how to fix a flat tyre or any other? Email me! Please let me know and I shall email you back as soon as possible.

Structure of International Communication Management - English - 3 years - Full-time

Lectures

20

hours per week

Self-study

20

hours per week

Projects

10

hours per week

Study credits

60

in year one

Year 1

The first year is the foundation (propaedeutic) year

At ICM, we do things differently. Most universities solely focus on communication theory in the first year. We sketch out the international, professional environment our ICM students will most likely be exposed to. In the introductory Global Issues course, we focus on how communication can play a key part in addressing today’s social changes. The course Organisational Communication gives an integrated perspective on stakeholder relations and internal, corporate, intercultural and marketing communication. During the second semester of year one, you’ll work on an extensive group assignment called the Design Thinking Project. As part of this project, you’ll be working for an external provider. You’ll try to resolve a communication issue they might be struggling with. Last year, for example, students worked with the National Institute for Traffic Safety to help prevent accidents caused using smartphones on bicycles.

Timetable

Block 1
Global Issues, Media and Society
Introduction to Organisational Communication
Critical Thinking Skills
Writing skills
Study Skills
Talk Back
Block 2
Global Issues, Media and Society
Introduction to Organisational Communication
Information Seeking & Processing
Writing Skills
Study Skills
Talk Back
Block 3
Communication and Behaviour
Branding and Integrated Marketing Communication
Theoretical communication research
Design Thinking Project Part 1
Practical Research Skills
Block 4
Digital Communication
Digital Writing
Ethical Communication
Design Thinking Project Part 2
Drag sideways

Year 2

Delve deeper

The second part of ICM is all about putting your knowledge and critical thoughts into practice. For example, your added value for a large multinational or government body. You’ll take on the role of a communication advisor and further your knowledge through courses such as Media Relations, Advisory Skills and Public Communication. In addition to attending our acclaimed international classroom, we want you to experience adjusting to an unfamiliar international environment on an exchange. After all, it’s quite likely that you’ll actually have to do so after landing your first job. But don’t worry - you won’t have to do all the legwork to arrange the exchange yourself. At THUAS, we have a large network with 100 partner universities in Latin America, Japan, USA, UK, Indonesia, South Africa, Australia and more. You’ll also have the chance to follow minors at THUAS or another educational institution in the Netherlands.

Timetable

Block 1
Corporate Communication
Public Communication Theory
Budgeting and Project Management
Media Relations
Block 2
Advisory Skills
Practical Research Skills 2
Content Analysis
Project Public Communication
Block 3
Exchange and minors
Block 4
Exchange and minors
Drag sideways

Year 3

Internship and graduation

Ah yes, year three! The year when you get to write the ‘dreaded’ thesis. Well, that might be the case if you were to write a 30,000-word literary masterpiece on a subject you don’t find particularly interesting. At ICM, you’ll write your final paper combined with a five-month work placement at an international company. In the first semester, we prepare you for this challenge in courses such as Strategic Thinking, Advanced Writing and Placement Survival Skills. We’ll go to considerable lengths to coach you during your placement - to meet your needs as well as those of your host company. In fact, it’s probably why many ICM students get a job offer after their placement. Last year, for example, a student wrote a dissertation on how to improve Nike’s communication when processing online returns. We’ve also had more marketing inclined ICM students who wrote their final paper about advertising agencies like TBWA and Ogilvy.

Timetable

Block 1
Change Management
Quest Project
Advanced Writing
Practical Research Skills 3
Block 2
Quest Project
Strategic Thinking
Advanced Writing
Critical Thinking in Research
Block 3
Placement and final paper
Block 4
Placement and final paper
Drag sideways

Minors

Shape your degree

A lot of ICM students enter the workforce with some form of specialisation. This is what minors are all about - giving your ICM degree an edge. The list of minor options on ICM is endless. You might want to learn more about media relations and journalism, because you want to become a journalist, or you’d like to know how to handle questions from the press as a public relations officer. And what about a minor called Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which might help you approach communication issues from an alternative perspective? Other minors include Sustainability in Business, Crisis communication and Cross-Cultural Communication. Over half of ICM students go abroad in the year two to follow two minors at one of our partner universities in countries like Japan, UK, Korea or USA.

Working methods

Lectures, seminars, study visits, self-study, group activities and project work

Many people say ICM is something you study at an academic university because it’s so theoretical. And there may be some truth IN that. But, on THUAS’s ICM programme, you won’t be learning theory for the sake of it. All the theoretical courses can be directly applied to cases that you’ll have to deal with when you start out as a junior communication manager. This means you won’t just learn about general mass communication theories, as is the case with most universities. As an ICM student, you’ll advocate positive change. This means you don’t take existing thoughts and ideas for granted. You could, for example, think that organisations flood consumers’ social media feeds with unnecessary information which they consider to be ‘cool’ viral campaigns. ICM nourishes this critical mind-set and teaches you to find new ways of communicating an organisation’s vision to internal and external stakeholders.

Assistance during your studies

Study coaching and advice

We assume your time at ICM will run smoothly. However, we do offer personal assistance if you are experiencing any study problems. In the first year, you’ll be allocated a coach who can help you keep track of your study progress. He/she can help you improve your time management skills, or find the right people within the programme to answer more complicated questions. He/she will also support you if you have any personal problems that can adversely affect your schoolwork.

Collect ECTS

Binding Study Advice (BSA)

If you haven’t acquired the basics needed to continue the degree programme of your choice, you will have a hard time completing it successfully. To make sure that you have these basics, you will have to meet an academic progress standard during your first year as a student (the foundation year). If you have earned at least 50 of the 60 credits (or, if relevant, have satisfied a qualitative requirement), the Examination Board will give you a positive binding study advice to continue your degree programme. In most cases, if you earn fewer than 50 credits, you will receive a Negative Binding Study Advice (NBSA) and you will have to leave the degree programme.

But the Examination Board will always consider personal circumstances. These could include illness or participating in elite sports: personal conditions that might have kept you from meeting the required academic standard. In such cases, the Examination Board can postpone giving its study advice. This means that you can continue your degree programme for the time being and that your study advice will be issued later, possibly with additional conditions imposed.
It is important, however, that you inform the Examination Board immediately of any personal conditions that might apply to you.

In conclusion: every student is responsible for his or her own academic progress. For this reason, make sure to contact your academic career coach early on if things are not going well. Read all the rules and requirements for the binding study advice in Chapter 7 of the Programme and Examination Regulations (PER) for your degree programme.

Interested in
International Communication Management - English - 3 years - Full-time?

Apply now