International & European Law - English - Full-time

During your four years in our English-taught Law programme you’ll gain the skills employers look for which will enable you to have a successful international career in the legal field. That’s why we also lay emphasis on your personal and professional development, in particular on developing global awareness. The first two years lay the foundations for your future career, when you’ll learn about law through theory and practice in a comparative setting. Then in year three, you further specialise and deepen your legal skills and knowledge; you are able to follow a specific minor or a module in a legal field of your choosing. Alternatively you can go abroad, as you have the opportunity to study a semester at one of our partner universities. In your final year you’ll do an internship and a final project. Upon graduation you’ll have perfected how to analyse a legal question, advise a client, and how to represent a client.

Structure of International & European Law - English - Full-time

Lectures

13,5

hours per week

Self-study

25

hours per week

Projects

1.5

hours per week

Study credits

60

in year one


Year 1

The first year is the introductory (propadeutic) year

You start with the basics. Year one (the propaedeutic year) introduces you to the foundations of International and European law. During the first three weeks you’ll follow a course specifically designed to introduce you to the legal field, the basic skills, our programme, the university and The Hague. From there on, you will focus on EU Law, Public International Law, Tort, Company, and Family Law, building a solid foundation for the next three years.

We believe you should apply in practical and professional assignments what you have learnt from your law books. As a result, you will work on professional skills from day one. You will take courses on legal writing, reasoning and negotiating as well as learning the tools of the trade, from writing memoranda and letters of advice to draft decisions and legal analysis. All things that an outstanding international legal professional does well. You will encounter professional scenario’s that either directly come from practice or mirror legal practice.

Timetable

Module 1
Skills 1: Legal Analysis
Public International Law
Constitutional Law
Introduction to Law
Study & Career Coaching
Project 1: Model United Nations
Module 2
Skills 2: Legal Advising
Criminal Law
Administrative Law
Contract Law
Study & Career Coaching
Project 1: Model United Nations
Module 3
Skills 3: Representing
Corporate Law
Tort Law
Introduction to EU Law
Study & Career Coaching
Project 2: EU Parliament
Module 4
Skills 4: Decision Making
Human Rights Law
EU Decision Making
Property Law
Study & Career Coaching
Project 2: EU Parliament
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Year 2

Delve deeper

During year 2, you’ll strengthen and consolidate your legal skills when you’re introduced to International Criminal Law, International Trade, Labour Law and more. Then you will take part in group Moot Court projects representing fictitious corporate clients, assisting them with legal issues, like mergers and acquisitions. Or you will defend, or prosecute, an international war crime suspect. You’ll gain a perfect balance of theory and practice during our programme. There is even a chance to make a final plea at the Court of Justice in The Hague where judges will assess your performance.

Year 3

Specialisation and exchange

Your third year is all about exposing you to complex, real life issues and how law can positively or negatively affect topical challenges. To that end, we offer various modules that will propel you to the top in the job market. The module choices are broad, you can specialise in anything from Commercial Law to International Criminal Law, from Environmental Law to Human Rights. Two examples: In Human Rights you can learn about the challenges refugees and other minority groups face. In the Compliance Minor you will learn the latest about anti-money laundering and data protection. Many of our students also take advantage of studying abroad during a part of their third year. By doing this they are able to expand their experience and knowledge of law in a different setting.

Minors

But there is more! In year three you’ll have the opportunity to choose from the wide range of minors offered by the university. Our Law programme offers a number of minors covering important current developments in law and practice: Dispute Resolution, Cyber Security, Legal Technology and Compliance. These minors have been developed by the Law programme with experts from other disciplines to fully enhance your experience

Year 4

Internship and graduation

It is no secret that the international law job market is fiercely competitive. But the good news is that our law graduates are particularly successful at finding jobs within a year. That is because The Hague, the International City of Peace and Justice, hosts multiple prestigious international institutions, NGOs, embassies and international companies. We also organise an employment network event, where you can meet and network with legal professionals and look for internships and jobs.

Our partner institutions and companies advise us on our curriculum, internships and graduation projects, so we always stay relevant to current market demands. This culminates in year four when you work on your final graduation project and go on an internship for at least 100 working days.

The team of Law

Petra Lindhout


Peter Boswijk


Dr. Agnieszka Machnicka


William Worster


Dr. Michail Vagias


Paul Garlick


Christine Tremblay


Miera Sibug Montero


Desmond Johnson


Suhas Sagar


Daniel Russel


Nadia Rusinova


Zahra Mousavi


Stefania Marassi


Aurelien Lorange


Jaime de Jesus Lima


Dr. Tamara N. Lewis Arredondo


Mária Éva Földes, PhD


Dr. Calum Young


Jonas Fechtner


Madonna Hamidy


Andreea Manea


Carlos Correa


Dr. Luca Pantaleo


Chloe Desesquelles


Jeff Dahl


Alice Welland


Aleksandra Asscheman


Gregory Townsend


Leyla Gayibova


Artemis Malliaropoulou


Asier Garrido-Muñoz


Marta Kołacz


Sandra Nobréga


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Study visualised

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Minors

Shape your degree

In year three you’ll have the opportunity to choose from the wide range of minors offered by the university. Our Law programme offers a number of minors covering important current developments in law and practice: Dispute Resolution, Cyber Security, Legal Technology and Compliance. These minors have been developed by the Law programme with experts from other disciplines to fully enhance your experience.

Working methods

Our Law programme strikes an excellent balance between theory and practice. You will learn the theory of law in the lectures and in the workshops you will apply this theory to practical cases to deepen your understanding. In addition, we host the ‘meet-a-professional’ lecture series where you will attend inspiring talks given by professionals from international tribunals, international organisations and multinational corporations. They share their experience of how they make prosecutorial decisions or how they keep their company compliance with regulatory demands. To fuel your enthusiasm, in the first year you can visit relevant organisations in Brussels. In year two you can experience organisations like the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations first hand on a trip to Geneva. Throughout our programme you can participate in various Moot Court competitions, arguing for the best interests of your client.

News and Events

Contact the programme

Contact a current student

Assistance during your studies

Study coaching and advice

You’ll have the support of a tutor to guide you through project work and written assignments in years one and two, your thesis and internships. If you fall behind due to unforeseen circumstances our study coach will help you get back on track.

Collect ECTS

Binding Study Advice (BSA)

To continue your degree programme after the first year, you need to earn 50 of the 60 credits (EC or Credits). In some cases, the degree programme may also require that you pass a specific subject as European art of the credit requirements. We call this a qualitative requirement. If you meet the credit requirements as well as the qualitative requirement where applicable, you will receive a positive binding study advice (BSA) from the Examination Board at the end of your first year and you will be able to continue your degree programme.

If you earn less than 50 credits or don’t meet the qualitative requirements where applicable, you will receive a negative binding study advice and will have to leave the degree programme. This is why this advice is called a Negative Binding Study Advice (NBSA). 

Your academic progress may be affected by personal circumstances such as illness or the professional practice of a sport. It is important that you inform the Examination Board immediately of any personal circumstances that might apply to you. The Board can take these into account when issuing its study advice.

Read all the rules for the binding study advice in Chapter 7 of the Programme and Examination Regulations (PER)  (PER) for your degree programme.


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